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{ Category Archives } Software

teaser: code completion in skywriter/ajax.org code editor using jstut and narcissus

I’ve hooked up jstut’s (formerly narscribblus‘) narcissus-based parser and jsctags-based abstract interpreter up to the ajax.org code editor (ace, to be the basis for skywriter, the renamed and somewhat rewritten bespin).  Ace’s built-in syntax highlighters are based on the somewhat traditional regex-based state machine pattern and have no deep understanding of JS.  The tokenizers have […]

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non-infuriating indentation with emacs and js2-mode with require.def asynchronous module definition CommonJS boilerplate

Classic CommonJS modules assume a synchronous execution environment (for the purposes of “require”) with a specialized loader mechanism that evaluates the module in its proper context and takes care of namespacing it.  If you want to use CommonJS modules in the browser you can either: Leave the source code as it is and use an […]

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(clicky.visophyte.org-hosted CouchDB services offline)

This means doccelerator and my Tinderbox scraper that chucked stuff into a CouchDB for exposure by a modified bugzilla jetpack.  Either couch went crazy or someone gave it a request that is ridiculously expensive to answer with a database the accumulated size of the tinderbox database.  I’m not aware of any trivial ways to contend […]

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ediosk: an emacs buffer switcher for the rest of us

Emacs users and would-be emacs users, are you tired of those emacs developers in their ivory towers not supporting buffer switching via touch-screen on a computer that’s not running emacs and using modern web browser technology instead of disproven parentheses-based technology?  Be tired no more!* Thanks to Christopher Wellons and Chunye Wang’s work on emacs-httpd […]

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Doccelerator: JavaScript documentation via JSHydra into CouchDB with an AJAX UI

About the name.  David Ascher picked it.  My choice was flamboydoc in recognition of my love of angry fruit salad color themes and because every remotely sane name has already been used by the 10 million other documentation tools out there.  Regrettably not only have we lost the excellent name, but the color scheme is […]

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Adding stews (hackish destructive accumulation/reduction) to CouchDB

As all misguidedly-lazy programmers are wont to do, I decided that it would be easier to ‘enhance’ CouchDB to meet my needs rather than to rewrite visotank to use SQLAlchemy. Also, I wanted to understand what CouchDB was doing under the hood with views and try my hand at some Erlang. CouchDB as currently implemented […]

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more (clicky!) mailing-list visualization a la visotank, couchdb

Visotank now allows you to select some authors of interest from a sortable list of contacts, and then show the conversations they were involved in. You get the previously shown sparkbars for the author’s activity. You also get sparkbars showing the conversation activity, with each author assigned a color and consistent stacking position in that […]

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first steps to interactive fun using CouchDB

First, let me say that Pylons with its Paste magic is delightful; lots of nice round edges helped me get something simple up and running in no time, and using genshi to boot. The new tool, visotank, is ingesting the python-dev mailman archives (as previously visualized) and putting them into CouchDB. The near-term goal is […]

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radial (radar) email vis, with care factors

It’s a radial e-mail visualization intended to be the basis for a “situational awareness” overview of your e-mail. I’ve added the beginnings of a ‘care factor’* (“do I care about this person/message?”) concept to messages and contacts, which is used to assist in focusing your attention only to messages/people you care about. Right now, the […]

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some email analysis for some email visualization

An attempt to apply hidden topic markov models to e-mail to perform topic analysis has morphed into simply deriving (aggregate) word-frequency information for TF-IDF purposes. The e-mails I attempted to analyze from my corpus appear to simply have been too short and wanting for quantity to pull a rabbit out of the (algorithmic) hat. (I […]

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